places to see

Country Inn Bed & Breakfast Sannat Gozo

The Country Inn is a traditional Gozitan Farmhouse that has recently been converted to a 7-bedroom house. Tucked away in a private cul-de-sac on the outskirts of Sannat village, this gem has been renovated to an even higher standard. Every bedroom is tastefully furnished with its own private ensuite shower room.

The Country Inn has a private south-facing pool which offers hours of enjoyment. The house is also situated in the countryside area just a few minutes’ walk away from ta’ Cenc and Sanap cliffs making for marvellous walks.

In terms of accessibility, it is situated just 1 km from the town centre of Sannat and 3 km from Victoria, the capital city of Gozo. The latter can be reached via the bus stop found just a minute’s walk away from the Inn. The closest seaside area is Xlendi bay, which is about 2 km away.

When renting a room, you can either select a bedroom with a double bed or twin beds. Every room has its own private shower room, air-conditioning, flat-screen television, satellite reception, Wi-Fi and wired internet for fast internet connection.

A self-serve complimentary breakfast is provided.

About Gozo

Gozo  –   Maltese: Għawdex, pronounced “awdɛsh, formerly Gaulos in Ancient Greek) is an island of the Maltese archipelago in the Mediterranean Sea. The island is part of Malta. After the island of Malta itself, it is the second-largest island in the archipelago. Compared to its southeastern neighbor, Gozo is more rural and known for its scenic hills, which are featured on its coat of arms.

The island of Gozo has long been associated with Ogygia, the island home of the nymph Calypso in Homer’s Odyssey. In that story, Calypso, possessed of great supernatural powers, and in love with Odysseus, holds him captive for a number of years, until finally releasing him to continue his journey home.

As of March 2015, the island has a population of around 37,342 (out of Malta’s total of 445,000), and its inhabitants are known as Gozitans (Maltese: Għawdxin). It is rich in historic locations such as the Ġgantija temples, which, along with the other Megalithic Temples of Malta, are among the world’s oldest free-standing structures.

The island is rural in character and, compared to the main island Malta, less developed. It was known for the Azure Window, a natural limestone arch that was a remarkable geological feature, until its collapse in 2017. The island has other notable natural features, including the Inland Sea and Wied il-Mielaħ Window. There are many beaches on the island, as well as seaside resorts that are popular with both locals and tourists, the most popular being Marsalforn and Xlendi. Gozo is considered one of the top diving destinations in the Mediterranean and a center for water sports.

Gozo has been inhabited since 5000 BC when farmers from nearby Sicily crossed the sea to the island. Due to the discovery of similar pottery found in both places from the Għar Dalam phase, it has been suggested that the first colonists were specifically from the area of Agrigento; however, it is currently unknown exactly where in Sicily the farmers came from. They are thought to have first lived in caves on the outskirts of what is now known as San Lawrenz.

Gozo was an important place for cultural evolution, and during the neolithic period the Ġgantija temples were built; they are among the world’s oldest free-standing structures, as well as the world’s oldest religious structures. The temple’s name is Maltese for “belonging to the giants”, because legend in Maltese and Gozitan folklore says the temples were built by giants. Another important Maltese archaeological site in Gozo, which dates back to the neolithic period, is the Xagħra Stone Circle. Also, native tradition and certain ancient Greek historians (notably Euhemerus and Callimachus) maintain that Gozo is the island Homer described as Ogygia, home of the nymph Calypso.

In July 1551 Ottomans under Sinan Pasha and Dragut invaded and ravaged Gozo and enslaved most of its inhabitants, about 5,000, bringing them to Tarhuna Wa Msalata in Libya, their departure port in Gozo was Mġarr ix-Xini. The island of Gozo was repopulated between 1565 and 1580 by people from mainland Malta, undertaken by the Knights of Malta.

The history of Gozo is strongly coupled with the history of Malta, since Gozo has been governed by Malta throughout history, with the brief exception of a short period of autonomy following the uprising against the French forces after Napoleon’s conquest of Malta, between 28 October 1798 and 20 August 1801.

Walking Tours

The first rain after the long, hot summer brings the landscape to life with an astonishing variety of wild flowers.

From mid-November until mid-May or so, you’ll find the Islands green and lush. Fields are full of vegetables and waysides are carpeted with fennel, clover, wild iris, myrtle and much more. By late spring, a thousand or more species of plants will be in flower.

Away from the resorts and urban areas of central Malta, there is a surprising amount of countryside, some left almost untouched by modernity. You may be surprised to learn that only around one-fifth of the Maltese Islands is urbanised. Farmers often use traditional labour-intensive methods of the past. Village life still centres on the agricultural and fishing seasons.

Today, as in past times, you will still see old men and women, sometimes with their extended families, working the fields. In the north of Malta, where the ground is barren, and in many parts of Gozo, you’ll come across small flocks of shaggy-coated goats and sheep being herded along the wayside.

The Islands offer walkers some of the most stunning views anywhere in the Mediterranean. The first thing to do is to decide what sort of view you prefer – dramatic cliffs plunging into waves, the rocky, scrubland of the garrigue or hidden, lush valleys. En route, you’ll come across mysterious, prehistoric sites, cave chapels and secluded palaces of the Knights.

In Malta, areas that make excellent day hikes, are Mellieħa, Dingli, Għar Lapsi, Fawwara, Wardija, all the North and the various bays, and the southern coast with its fishing villages and Delimara Point.

Gozo in its entirety is excellent walking country. Ta’ Dbieġi, near San Lawrenz, the Ġordan Lighthouse near Għasri, Ħondoq ir-Rummien near Qala and San Blas Valley near Nadur are all excellent walking areas. The Island is criss-crossed by tracks and lanes. The possibilities are endless.

Don’t miss tiny Comino, ideal for a good day’s hiking and the ultimate in solitude and views.

Put on walking boots, hire a mountain bike and head out from the village squares on the narrow farmers’ tracks. You’ll find yourself in a timeless landscape, quite alone even in peak season. There is plenty to discover, from ancient farmhouses and wayside chapels to spectacular seascapes. It is well worth the effort!